Wednesday, August 27, 2008

The world is Flat - take 3 - or more if you want

Here are three views of The World is Flat. The first is a visual mural created by a visioneer listening to Charlie Rose interviewing Tom Friedman on The Charlie Rose show.. click on the mural for a larger,sharper image



The second is the Charlie Rose interview on You Tube

The third is a selection from Slideshare where the same information is conveyed in a powerpoint presentation produced by consultant Andi Boediman (credits at the end of the preso) you can watch the preso right here or click on the slideshare logo at the bottom right of the embedded slides to go to a full screen version for better viewing.

The World Is Flat
View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: insourcing education)


Take the tour from the mural to the video to the slideshow - eventually I will edit the video and provide clickable links from the mural to the related short video clips that provide the narrative background - and perhaps I will do this also with the slideshare deck, providing my own voice over narration and hopefully making it possible for viewers/listeners to switch back and forth between the different media.

Of course there should also be a clickable button for ordering Tom'sbook from Amazon or maybe even better his revised version. like this Amazon.com: The World Is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century: Thomas L. Friedman: Books which takes you to Amazon where you have these choices:

5 comments:

Ed M said...

Dave,

Are you trying to create that "full presentation" that we briefly talked about via comments to your previous post.
Before thoroughly reading this post I saw each medium (picture, video, slides) and choose the video to watch. I was interested in what Friedman had to say as I've not yet read his book but saw it critiqued by Florida in "Who's Your City". After seeing just the first 24 minutes of the video, I reread your post; interested in why your posting about this book now, some four years after it came out.

Have you created a tool that helps present slides with video or pictures so as not to "leave out information"?

dave davison said...

Ed m - i can imagine why you are curious about my digging up Tom and the World is Flat 4 years after he published - but the concept of integrating the combination of a visual map, the live video, a slideshare PPT done by yet another reviewer of the book and the fact that Tom keeps milking what is really pretty evergreen content keeps me coming back to the original concept that you commented on in my post on the Starfish and the Spider when you first commented.

I have been trolling this concept of capturing the esssence of thought leaders from their books and public speeches and the commentary or value-added reviews others provide to the mix in a way that is maximizes the viewers ROA ( (return on Attention) yet provides a broader discovery opportunity for people who wish to start with the composite I might create as shown in the example and flow from there to the vast body of information the Web provides - if they are interested.

This has been sort of a blogger's hobby, but I have several other examples that may be more germane and if you wish to see the and comment further please do so

Heres a more recent one focusing on the excellent thought leader videos from TED conferences Thoughts Illustrated: BIGVIZ - an ebook of sketches from TED2008

The tools for semiautomated post production editing of serial audio and video content are much more avaialable today and I expect to continue this hobby until a real business model suitable for authors, publishers and reader/viewers emerges. It's close
but not on my primary radar screen at the moment

thanks for your comments.
Dave

Ed M said...

A couple of thoughts. First, I get excited about tools for combining slides, video, audio, and other information streams into a single distribution unit. As I am primarly an end user, my goal is universal usage of such tools so every lecture I view no matter the source brings me the full information presented. Thus I envision some sort of open standard which covers data transmission, event marking, etc. which allows software makers to interoperate and combine various data streams. So whether someone is presenting using a pdf file, Keynote, PowerPoint, OpenOffice and whether they are recoring audio on a laptop or through a sound system and recording using a basic camera or full production setup organizations can put together a basic production within 5 to 15 minutes the lectures end.

Your comments have brought me back to your concept of ROA. There is something powerful about the visual and the Mapping Around the Edges example looks interesting. C-Span uses a tool for highlighting video excerpts out of full broadcasts. Here is an example of the tool in use. Clicking on the red Flash video button brings up the video player. In additon to the normal play/pause buttons on the player, you can add a start/stop mark to the video and then create an embedded video or link to that segment you've just highlighted.

Ed M said...

A couple of thoughts. First, I get excited about tools for combining slides, video, audio, and other information streams into a single distribution unit. As I am primarly an end user, my goal is universal usage of such tools so every lecture I view no matter the source brings me the full information presented. Thus I envision some sort of open standard which covers data transmission, event marking, etc. which allows software makers to interoperate and combine various data streams. So whether someone is presenting using a pdf file, Keynote, PowerPoint, OpenOffice and whether they are recoring audio on a laptop or through a sound system and recording using a basic camera or full production setup organizations can put together a basic production within 5 to 15 minutes the lectures end.

Your comments have brought me back to your concept of ROA. There is something powerful about the visual and the Mapping Around the Edges example looks interesting. C-Span uses a tool for highlighting video excerpts out of full broadcasts. Here is an example of the tool in use. Clicking on the red Flash video button brings up the video player. In additon to the normal play/pause buttons on the player, you can add a start/stop mark to the video and then create an embedded video or link to that segment you've just highlighted.

dave davison said...

Ed M - the CSpan example shows the capability needed to make the post production editing and clipping easier to do.

I guess it is not serendipity that the clip you linked to was a congressional hearing on the subject of Deep Packet Inspection of video and the issue of user privacy and unfair use by advertisers and marketers and others of the user's click stream.

I am intrigued by our conversation in this comment stream and would like to make contact directly with you so that I could discuss your interest in the ROA values of combining multiple media streams into a single distribution unit.

The web is rich with smart aggregations being collected and archived into a dynamic knowledge repository( to use Doug Engelbart's phrase) They include not only CSpan but Slideshare(slides,audio overdub), the Conversation Network( multiple channels of Thought Leader speeches - audio only) TED Talks and Miro ( Video archive of the TED conferences)Flickr(digital image collections tagged by participants) YouTube ( video with participant tagging)iTunes( audio/video playlists) etc. etc.

I have posted earlier about the insightful views of Umair Haque about the disruptive process of peer-produced social media and what he calls the role of the Reconstructor. Thoughts Illustrated: The atomizing hand of Media 2.0 - Umair Haque

I'd like to get better acquainted with you offline - Here is my email address: papadavo at gmail dot com.

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