Wednesday, September 05, 2007

A Brief Message - twitter vs blogger?



Although this image is from a new blog on design, it could certainly apply to the dilemma of continuous partial attention (CPA) and from the punch line "short is in", it would appear that microblogging as in Twitter meets the criteria outlined above.

My take is that Return on Attention (ROA) thrives on "short is in" and that pithy text and powerful images deliver content in the most effective way, but my experience to date with Twitter is very mixed.


I need is a way to filter the incoming flood so that it raises the signal above the noise. Maybe my conversation with Adam Green of Grazr this afternoon will shed some light on how to manage microblogs along with all the other social networking stuff.

PS this post would have exceeded the Twitter 140 character limit by the second sentence. If short is in, maybe I'm out!

A Brief Message

7 comments:

michael j pastor said...

If it weren't for the constant "half-heard" style of comments via twitter, I'd agree that it's analogous to a blog, but its more analagous to the comments section on a blog, then a blog itself. It's as extraverted as a blog, or personal webpage. But it's distinctly more interactive than reflective, like a blog.

dave davison said...

i am hopeful that in meeting with Adam Green of Grazr today that we can deal with the signal to noise problem by putting some databasing filters on the twitter traffic so that the good stuff filters through

I think twitter is more spontaneously extraverted than a blog - and is a slightly "delayed" IM/SMS messaging process

I think the 140 character limit drives stream of consciousness microblogging - and misses some of the structure that a blog/commment process enables.

However, I did finally get to David Armano's telephone via twitting him (intentional pun)that "waiting for David was worse than waiting for Godot"

do you have a MUchat diagram for placing the various social network communication, collaboration tools on a map?

isabella mori said...

it's interesting that you'd connect the 140 characters on twitter with stream of consciousness and lack of structure. that's the opposite of my experience, both as a writer and reader in twitter. i wonder what that's about? do we hang out in different twitter circles?

and twitter being extraverted ... hmmm ... gonna have to think about that (beyond the obvious, of course)

dave davison said...

Isabella: we probably do hang out in different circles. but what I learned today from Adam is that, if I want to be stay in the flow of the early adopters of twitter - I need a filter to raise the signal from the noise and he is developing that filter.

If you want to have your cake and eat it - watch this space for news.

dave davison said...

what a bizarre and wonderful world we co-inhabit when a change therapist finds my blog and comments

I am delighted to see you,Isabella, and would like to understand how twitter works for you as a writer and a reader. how does it complement your blog where you can muse more thoughtfully and at greater length than twitter allows?

Shaping Youth said...

I just left a message for you back on my own blog, Dave...Thought I'd add two cents more:

Much like the Tumblr short form blog format enables a diff. user experience than a full blown analysis blog like Shaping Youth.org Twitter's 140 character limitation has its place in the media maelstrom as well...

As a writer, the need for concise edits to capture a thought bubble accurately is often more challenging than rambling poetic prose. It's like expressing yourself in a medium of sound bites and taglines...tough to do w/any level of profoundity, but poignant when executed well!

I actually appreciate Twitter's free form spontaneity, and can see how I might use it as almost a "Jott" style app to reach thought leaders under severe time crunches who seem to be living on the short form tools. (David's a case in point, eh?)

That said, your database filtering idea is a 'value-add' that would put it off the charts in my book...so I hope your friend Adam puts me on his early adopter ping list! ;-)

To me, that would be the 'killer app' of relevance that would truly give Twitter the chops to be a 'collective knowledge depository' with value far beyond its current uses as mental floss.

dave davison said...

You're on the ping list.Coming soon!

That said, your database filtering idea is a 'value-add' that would put it off the charts in my book...so I hope your friend Adam puts me on his early adopter ping list! ;-)

To me, that would be the 'killer app' of relevance that would truly give Twitter the chops to be a 'collective knowledge depository' with value far beyond its current uses as mental floss.

Tags

ShareThis

Ti panel